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The Holbrook Insider

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News Bin - December 20, 2019

Dec 20, 2019 |

News Roundup

| by Meghan Pipa

Bringing you the latest news, information, and resources from around the web. In the December 20 edition, read more about the following:

  • The 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year
  • Here’s how travelers can help protect frogs in Costa Rica
  • Polar bears, ice cracks, and isolation: scientists drift across the Arctic Ocean
  • Why the world needs bloodsucking creatures
  • Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints

The 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

The Natural History Museum of London announced the winners for the 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year. Out of 48,000 entries, a specialized committee selected 19 category winners and two grand prize winners. See the winners’ photographs that beautifully capture the spectacular diversity of life on Earth.

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Here’s how travelers can help protect frogs in Costa Rica

Frog populations are declining due to habitat loss and pollution, and as Earth’s climate gets warmer, frogs’ future is in peril. Lodges are building frog-friendly ponds and promoting frog-focused travel to protect the vulnerable amphibians and the ecosystems they impact.

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Polar bears, ice cracks, and isolation: scientists drift across the Arctic Ocean

Hundreds of scientists from 20 nations will live aboard a frozen-in ship over the course of the next year as a part of the largest Arctic science mission called the Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate. These scientists will dig into the physics, chemistry, and biology of this scientific mission while facing the dangers that the Arctic environment imposes.

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Why the world needs bloodsucking creatures

Blood-feeding creatures have no common ancestor; the behavior evolved independently, making bloodsucking an intriguing subject for scientists. From vampire snails to the Oxpecker birds of Africa, learn about the symbiotic relationships between blood-slurping organisms and their victims.

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Climate scientists try to cut their own carbon footprints

Georgia Tech professor and climate scientist Kim Cobb sacrifices her influential voice at climate change conferences to reduce her own carbon footprint. Are scientists and climate activists hindering their own clout in the climate change movement by cutting down on carbon?

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main photo by Greg Basco