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The Holbrook Insider

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News Bin - September 22, 2017

Sep 22, 2017 |

News Roundup

| by Brittany Pendergrass

Bringing you the latest news, information, and resources from around the web. In the September 22nd edition, read more about the following:

  • Mysterious Amazon Animal Seen Alive for First Time in 80 Years
  • 30 Jaw-Dropping Ways to Experience Chile
  • Sea Turtles Appear to Be Bouncing Back Around the World
  • Rare White Giraffes Cause a Stir in Kenya
  • The fight against poaching must shift to empowering communities

Mysterious Amazon Animal Seen Alive for First Time in 80 Years

Laura Marsh, director of the Global Conservation Institute, identified five new species of saki monkeys in 2014.  Early this summer she and a team of scientist embarked on a 4 month journey on a two-story houseboat and headed towards Brazil's Peruvian border in hopes of the Vanzolini bald-faced saki monkey, which has not been seen alive in 80 years.

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30 Jaw-Dropping Ways to Experience Chile 

Through the lens of a camera you are able to truly experience the beauty of some of the world's most treasured sights. In this article, explore Chile through photographs that will be sure to make you want to see this amazing part of the world firsthand.

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Sea Turtles Appear to Be Bouncing Back Around the World

While scientists worry that many species around the world are at risk due to climate change and loss of habitat, the sea turtle might be the exception. According to the article, "Dr. Mazaris and his colleagues analyzed existing public data of sea turtle nesting sites around the world over time periods ranging from six to 47 years. They standardized individual data sets and evaluated each site separately and then combined them into regional populations to look at changes. Even small populations, which normally have a tough time recovering, are capable of being restored..."

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Rare White Giraffes Cause a Stir in Kenya 

A villager in Kenya stumbled upon one of the most incredible sights ever seen, "a ghostly creature with a mighty long neck" in the distance. The news travelled through continents as conservationists hurried to the sight to capture what many believe to be the first known video footage of white giraffes, said Abdullahi H. Ali, founder of the Hirola Conservation Program.

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The fight against poaching must shift to empowering communities

"South Africa – is home to some of the world’s largest and most diverse populations of endangered plants, animals and mineral resources. It is also one of the world’s most economically and structurally unequal societies."  At times, locals are often forced into illegal poaching to make a living. Through community empowerment can help address structural inequality and poverty, but can also help in eliminating wildlife crime. One example came from out by Namibia, there, the article says, former poachers have become wildlife guardians.

 *Note: This article is based on a longer article first published in the South African Crime Quarterly. The special issue was funded by the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime.

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Photo by Laura Hare